Steam Deck: Valve solves delivery problems, orders are faster than expected

Steam Deck: Valve solves delivery problems, orders are faster than expected


from Maximilian Hohm
Valve appears to have fixed some supply chain issues, making the Steam decks available faster than anticipated. Customers have therefore been moved up the waiting list and everyone who has already reserved a Steam Deck should receive it this year. Read more about this below.

Valve’s Steam Deck is an affordable handheld with decent performance that seems to have hit the zeitgeist and is in correspondingly good demand. For a long time there were problems with the amount of available Steam Decks and buyers or pre-orderers had to wait a long time for their mobile game consoles. These problems should now be largely solved and customers in the reservation queue should be able to receive a Steam Deck faster than expected.

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Valve has adjusted the reservation windows accordingly and announced that all customers currently in the reservation queue will receive their own Steam Deck later this year. Many customers whose expected delivery date was in the fourth quarter or even later were able to be upgraded to the third quarter and will therefore receive their Steam Deck much earlier. Those originally scheduled to be served after the fourth quarter of 2022 have now been brought forward to at least the fourth quarter.


If you haven’t signed up for a Steam Deck yet and would like to own one this year, you can still do so directly in the Steam Shop. There is a charge of four euros for the reservation, which is offset against the purchase price at the time of purchase. Currently, these customers will also receive their Steam Deck in the fourth quarter, although Valve cannot ensure that this will be the case for a long time. Customers who register late are automatically added to the next quarter.

Source: valves

Reference-www.pcgameshardware.de

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